Friday, February 21, 2014

ON PRISON'S BED


 



 Written by Eulie

Tonight, as I sit here on prison's version of a bed
Everything seems just so right.
Winter season will soon be gone.
The rain falls gracefully
Washing all things exposed to a perfect cleanliness.
Sometimes, I wish life's trials could be washed
away so easily.

It starts with just a little drizzle, at first
To clear up all the surface stains.
And then a downpour erupts - without a moment's notice.

I could have my freedom back
if the word "granted" was stamped.
And, I could be somewhere out there
Away from burdens, free with monitored care.
Soon enough, this prison sentence must expire.

Through it all, I learned one thing.
Those things I once enjoyed could never bring
The peacefulness I now have on the inside
The joy in spirit that I can't hide.

All because I've surrendered life sentences
It's the one thing I've done right -
With the exception of repentance.

So, while I lay here on prison's version of a bed
I will soon bow my head
And say a prayer of gratitude
And petition for help to move forward
Surrendering the past into the future
And making wise choices.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Le Kompa


by Eulie

I lay in bed and look out the window. 
I see clouds forming on nature’s canvas
And painting the sky with shades of grey.
I don’t need my radio to drown out the everyday
Chaos of my surroundings.
The approaching storm gives my batteries
A much needed breather.

I close my eyes and am transported
To a Caribbean concert hall.
Thunder pulsates through the walls
Like beating drums.

The wind is the guida,
The rain a tambora,
And the lightening clashing cymbals.
The storm is the Maestro and
Together they play Kompa (Haitian Music).

I listen to the music.
It reminds me of my life
Before it was stained like
This barred and soiled window -
A window that has witnessed
Tears of regret for all the misprints
Of my life.

The storm fades. The song ends.
I wish to open the window
And smell the wet earth,
But it won’t budge.
It imprisons me.

One day, I will not have to look
Through this barricade.
I will be set free
To try again and

Go back to life after the storm.

Sunday, September 1, 2013

The Walls Speak




by Eulie
Cell block of Kilmainham prison in Ireland











I know these walls can talk. It's true.
I hear them daily, I can hear them now.
Shhhh, can you?
No? Okay. Come a little closer.
Not yet?
I know it's hard to hear with the officers shouting,
Inmates counting, doors slamming,
And women shrieking in despair.

It's not quiet here. Not ever.
Not even for a minute.
When it's too quiet - something is wrong.

Even in the night, when the noise ebbs and
The daily, mundane routine ends,
The time when my mind takes over,
And the sounds of silence pierce the air
With stories of shame,
Stories of fear,
Stories of bad choices,
Stories of abandonment,
Stories of humiliation,
Stories of poverty,
Stories of neglect,
Stories of abuse and pain.

Even the walls cry out, "Mercy, Grace!"

I know because I hear them.
They cry because they're
ugly, beige cinderblocks - not worth a second look,
Not worth a first, for that matter.
Mostly they cry because nobody hears them.
I know this because they told me.
They scream inside with the longing to share stories,
To talk about mistakes made and lessons learned,
To teach through experience,
To tell others they know what it is like to walk a mile in their shoes.
But no one wants to listen.
Will you read my writings and listen?

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Eulie is my pen pal through Letters 4 the Lord.  I am blessed by her friendship and her letters.
Linda

Thursday, August 1, 2013

New Amazon Reviews

THE WOMEN OF BLOCK 12: Voices from a Jail Ministry

"Linda provides one of the most poignant, raw, and honest accounts of "life" in a women's jail that I have ever read. I especially appreciate how she reveals the emotional and spiritual journey she traveled while teaching in the jail. I had the pleasure of interviewing Linda last year about her experiences and was even more impressed by her work after speaking with her." ProfBreeWill

"This book is a story, it's powerful and inspiring. The book is about jail ministry, it's about women in prison and about the roads these women travel. But, more importantly it is an experience. If you have not been in prison, read it. If you have you may have written something in this book. The personal stories are rare, common and bring light to darkness.If you are in a book club consider this. If you are not, be sure to share this book with your friends. Linda Pischke has taken her consistent visits, her care and compassion, her heart for God to those who will listen. She has listened. You should read!"  Toni Dunn 

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To see all of the Amazon reviews or to write one of your own visit: 

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Life In Prison



By Eulie                                                                    


"Do not fear anyof those things which you are about to suffer. Indeed, the devil is about to throw some of you into prison, that you may be tested . . ."    Revelation 2:10



Prison, need I say more? Prison is the most horrific, life-changing mistake that I have ever experienced. It is the tragic result of the foolish choices which I pursued. 

In this environment, you can make the best out of a bad and negative situation, or you can allow it to consume you, swallow you whole, as it slowly destroys your soul.

For me, this frightening odyssey has been and continues to be a vivid eye-opener - a priceless, indelible learning journey - if you will.

I can honestly say that this awful, stagnant place has been a "blessing in disguise."  The majority of my education here has been of a spiritual nature. My faith in Jesus is stronger than ever before. I believe, with all of my heart that I am using this time away from the "free world" wisely. I am acquiring the necessary knowledge to "Ace the test!"

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To read more about women in prison visit:

Thursday, June 20, 2013

THE WOMEN OF BLOCK 12 on Bold Living

Linda Pischke's Interview with  
Diane Markins
Saturday, June 22
11:00 am PDT   (1:00 Milwaukee)


Bold Living w/Diane Markins



Why Prison Ministry?
by Linda Pischke
The United States leads the world in producing prisoners. In 2008, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, there were 2.3 million men and women incarcerated in the US. Eighty-five percent of these individuals are non-violent offenders who will eventually return home to live in our communities.
Whether we pay higher prices for goods and services as a result of theft, or come into direct contact with someone who has committed a crime, all of us are affected in some way by the actions and decisions of these individuals. We can no longer live with the illusion that if we just put enough bad people behind bars, our society will be safe.
The barriers to successful re-integration are overwhelming for offenders who lack basic education and job skills. Even minimum wage jobs can be out of reach for individuals with a criminal record. An offender can lose everything while incarcerated. Unless there is a family and a job waiting for her, it is unlikely she will secure shelter, furniture, transportation, and medical care without the help of community agencies.
I have seen inmates go through this process multiple times. If a woman has exhausted all of her options for free resources, she may choose to return to an abusive partner who pays the rent and most likely got her in trouble in the first place. If that is not an option, the more resourceful woman will survive the only way she knows how: stealing, selling drugs, or selling herself. If arrested again, she becomes another statistic in a process called recidivism.
Can prison ministry really make a difference? The answer is “yes.” I have seen people turn their lives around because someone cared enough to mentor them. We will not heal every hurt or find a solution to every problem, but I believe Jesus calls us to love the unlovable, share the Gospel, and show mercy to everyone touched by the criminal justice system. The outcome is not our responsibility. The healing comes from him.


Sunday, May 26, 2013

Prison Ministry: Write a Letter - Save a Life

Screen Beans character holding mail and jumping for joy 



When I first signed up for a prison pen pal with Letters 4 The Lord, a ministry in Harrah, Oklahoma, I was a bit skeptical. Even though I had been working with women offenders in jail ministry, I was not sure I wanted to communicate with someone I'd never met.

I was given two names: Nancy who is now back home and connects with me on Facebook. and Eulie who is serving life in a southern state. Eulie and I have been writing for about 2 years and I must say, it is one of the most gratifying volunteer positions I have ever experienced.

I once heard;, "You can save a life by writing to someone in prison." I don't know if that's true, but here is an excerpt from one of Eulie's letters to me:

"One of the best things about having a good friend during this journey is all the grace you get. For instance, I'm guilty of my charge, yet you have compassion towards me, the accused. A godly, good friend that is not hardly phased by the sensational reports on me. I just can't begin to express my gratitude. Each of your correspondences makes me feel as though an arm has been put around me. Your mere presence "via mail" in my life speaks volumes. I pray that you find the truth in my words and writings . It's important to me that you witness my weakness and brokenness first hand and as long as God permits - that you stick by me. I thank you for reflecting God's grace."

If Christ has put it on your heart to "visit him in prison," please consider a pen pal. It's easy, it costs the price of a stamp, it will change your life and the life of another person.

Linda


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Learn more about prison ministry at::